How to find and link to a quote in a video

Recently, Google announced a couple of new features related to captions and subtitles on YouTube: automatic captions and automatic timing. A couple of days ago, they released a video of the announcement which was made in Washington, D.C. Of course, since I’m a geek, I watched the entire hour-long video, even though as Googler who manages a YouTube channel with over 100 captioned videos, I totally already knew about anything they would announce.

Or so I thought.

At 20:32 in the video, Ken mentions a search feature that I’ll admit I was unaware of. Since captions have timing data, it’s possible to not only find the video that contains a specific caption, but to also point the user directly to the part of the video they were looking for, which is especially useful for longer videos. Here’s how to do it:

Google Video

  1. Search for the text of the quote you’re looking for.
  2. Enable the “Closed captioned” filter in the left sidebar. (You can also start out your search with this filter on the Advanced Video Search page.)
  3. Make sure you’re in “List view,” and then click on “Start playing at search term” in the result you want to view.

YouTube

  1. Search for the text of the quote you’re looking for.
  2. Use the “Closed captions” option from the “Type” drop-down.
  3. Click on “Start playing at search term” in the result you want to view.

And once you’ve found that specific point in the video that you want to share with everyone, you can link directly to it by adding this to the end of the URL, using 20 minutes and 32 seconds as an example: #t=20m32s

Note that a similar feature exists in the Google Voice app for Android, which allows you to jump to a specific part of a voicemail just by tapping on a word in the transcript.

Finally, I wanted to highlight one more announcement that was made recently about captions and subtitles. Google Translator Toolkit, a free service that assists with translation tasks, now supports editing subtitles in the .srt or .sub format. Just upload your subtitle or caption file with the correct extension (don’t save it as .txt), and you’re on your way to faster translations and a wider audience.

Disclaimer

You may already own a free GPS navigation system

Do you have an Android phone? Then stop what you’re doing, install the new Google Maps application which features navigation, and head to your car.
I’m writing this quickly, so you can read more about the awesome features like the ability to search along your route on the official blog post, but here are my favorite attributes of the product:
- Since it’s on your phone, it’s always with you.
- Map data is always up-to-date, and updates are free
- You can search using your voice
That last bit is pretty important, and I hope you try it out. As you may have already seen, our voice search quality [http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SuzjyVjQBXA] is getting amazingly good. In the car especially, you often don’t want to spend a lot of time typing. Before I started using Google Maps with Navigation, I would often first look up a business using [http://www.google.com/goog411/]GOOG-411, have it text me the address, and then enter that into my [http://wysz.com/wyszdom/2008/07/easily-amused/]Garmin GPS. Now, I can skip a few steps and say the destination directly to my phone, with no typing necessary. And remember that you don’t just have to search for a business name. If you’re entering a street address, just go ahead and say it. I’ve found that if you speak [number] + [street] + [city] + [state], it can work pretty well in many cases.
Keep your eyes on the road, and have fun!

Do you have an Android phone? Then stop what you’re doing, install the new Google Maps application which features Navigation (available in the Android Market), and head to your car.

You can read more about it on the official blog post, but here are my favorite attributes of the product, which runs just fine on my G1.

  • Since it’s on your phone, it’s always with you.
  • Map data is always up-to-date, and updates are free.
  • You can search using your voice.

That last bit is pretty important, and I hope you try it out. As you may have already seen, our voice search quality  is getting amazingly good. In the car especially, you often don’t want to spend a lot of time typing. Before I started using Google Maps Navigation, I would often first look up a business using GOOG-411, have it text me the address, and then enter that into my Garmin GPS. Now, I can skip a few steps and say the destination directly to my phone, with no typing necessary. And remember that you don’t just have to search for a business name. If you’re entering a street address, just go ahead and say it. I’ve found that if you speak [number] + [street] + [city] + [state], it can work pretty well in many cases.

I haven’t dumped my standalone GPS yet since I still travel to places like Colorado where I drive in areas without a data connection, but for my day-to-day navigation, Google Maps Navigation has proven to be extremely useful.

Keep your eyes on the road, and have fun!